Just Eat It

Just Eat It

When you finish your food and put your plate on the accumulator, do you ever wonder where your leftovers go? As someone who has worked in the dishroom multiple times, I can show you just where these dirty dishes end up. All of the plates that are taken from the accumulator need to be washed and put on the conveyor belt that leads to a huge washing machine. Sounds easy, right? Well it is easy only when the plates are empty. The most troublesome step in this process is dumping all the wasted food into the sink. Looking at the accumulator, I saw plates with tons of food on them. Some plates only had a few bites taken from them, while others had not even been touched.     

Sometimes students may fail to estimate the size of their appetites, so they take more than they can eat. The temptation to enjoy the wide variety of food available to us in the dining hall is fully understandable: it is easy to load up on multiple dishes without thinking twice about the extent of one’s appetite. But this initial temptation can be overcome, and there are certain methods that help reduce food waste. One might go back for seconds, instead of taking all of the food at one time. Not only would this minimize potential food waste, but it would also allow us to enjoy the food more thoroughly. On the other hand, we could also take a little amount of food, have a taste, and then take more if we like it.  Sometimes the flavor of a certain food is not as we expected, but we have already taken too much and don’t want to finish it. Taking a small amount of food enables us to decide whether we want to have more or not, which will lead to less food wasted.

In general, less food waste is neither a difficult nor an unreachable goal. If we all work together to be more conscious about this issue, our community can reduce food waste and greatly benefit the environment. Besides, we should kindly give students who work in the dish-room a break by finishing what we have on our plates.

The Echoes of the Dual Narrative: the Search for Understanding the Arab/Israeli Conflict

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SpeakEasy: A Student Reading, This Thursday

SpeakEasy: A Student Reading, This Thursday