Advice for Course Registration from Department Chairs: Part Two

Advice for Course Registration from Department Chairs: Part Two

Last week I shared some advice on registering for classes from various department chairs. By now most students have met with their advisors and have probably received more personalized advice, but in case you still want more help I have reached out to a few more department chairs and have some advice from them to share.

Advice from Regina Janes, English Department Chair:

General Advice:

  • “Make sure that you take advantage of these four years to study things you may not have time of opportunity for later.”
  • “Never let the requirements of a minor or a second major stand in the way of taking a quirky course the intrigues you. Bag the minor, take the course that arouses your curiosity.”

Advice from Kyle Nichols, Chair of the Geoscience Department:

General Advice:

  • “I advise my students to explore a new interest/subject; take a class even if doesn’t fulfill a requirement.”

Advice for those thinking of taking a Geoscience class:

  • “Our 100-level courses [in the Geoscience department] usually fill quickly and have waitlists. We save seats for first-year students and sophomores, so there is significant pressure at the junior and senior level. If first-year students and sophomores are thinking of taking a Geoscience class out of interest or to fulfill a Natural Science requirement, I would urge them to enroll in an earlier semester rather than later in your time at Skidmore.”
  • “For juniors and seniors, if you end up on the wait list, hang in there; there is usually significant movement by the time the semester starts.”
  • “For all students, if you ever wanted to learn about how Earth has changed over time and how it informs the way that we live, consider taking a Geoscience Course.”

Advice from John Brueggemann, Chair of the Sociology Department:


General Advice:

  • “I encourage students to study the [course] catalogue. Look up courses in departments you never considered. Sometimes there are themes that faculty in other disciplines teach that touch upon a student’s interest but from a different vantage point.”
  • “In general it is healthy to stretch, try new things and explore, in addition to carefully studying the topics that attract you.”
  • “I also encourage students to talk to other students, especially those who are older or whose sense of teachers is resonant for them. Learn about what topics and teachers are out there. Find out from others which courses are the most interesting and exciting.”

Advice from Maria Lander, Department Chair of World Languages and Literature:

Advice for students with little or no background in languages:

  • “Start learning a new language now! The beginning-level courses are fun courses to take and you will soon recognize the power of language to truly understand a foreign culture.”

Hopefully this advice, the advice in last week’s article and meeting with your advisor during advising week will help to make the course registration process just a little smoother. Lastly, remember if you don’t get the course that you want follow Professor Nichols’ advice and add yourself to the waitlist since there is normally a lot of moving around in classes before the semester starts! 

 



 

 

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